'Hide' by Matthew Griffin

Hide is an exceedingly tough and emotionally wrenching book. Griffin’s writing is, however, simply beautiful… read more

'The Repercussions' by Catherine Hall

The Repercussions does not try to explain war, nor does it try to call us to action. It is simply a chronicle of the ways human beings mess each other up and what it takes, on an individual level, to keep on living… read more

'Worlds Apart' by David Plante

For readers who yearn more for good dish than spiritual pondering, it does not hurt that Plante’s “connections” are of the very best kind: Germaine Greer, Phillip Roth, David Hockney, to name a few. … read more

'Don’t Let Him Know' by Sandip Roy

Sandip Roy’s Don’t Let Him Know is a multi-generational story venturing deep into the hidden pasts of a single family over the course of decades…. read more

'The Prince's Boy' by Paul Bailey

With Dinu Grigorescu, Paul Bailey presents contemporary readers with a challenging narrator. Ailing while on the cusp of 60 in the spring of 1967 and certain that he has little time remaining, Dinu’s setting down a “memoir of a life half-lived.” Though mentioning in passing the lonely decades he endured in London after the mid-1930s,… read more

'Maggie & Me: Coming Out and Coming of Age in 1980s Scotland' by Damian Barr

Margaret Thatcher was no friend to Scotland – hundreds gathered in Glasgow’s George Square to celebrate her death in 2013 – nor was she one to the burgeoning gay community – she passed Section 28 which outlawed the promotion of the “acceptability of homosexuality” in 1988 – yet for the young Damian Barr, her indefatigable… read more

‘Inside a Pearl: My Years in Paris’ by Edmund White

“[…] this book is more than just a love letter to a city (the title comes from a declaration White once made to an American who complained about Paris: ‘I like it. To me it seems so calm after New York. As if I’d already died and gone to heaven. It’s like living inside a pearl.’), but to the people who made up his experiences there.”… read more