New month, new books!

This month, Feminist Press is releasing We Are Witches, a compelling examination of queerness and motherhood from author Ariel Gore.

From the publisher:

Cashing into the dream that education is the road out of poverty, a teen mom takes a chance on bettering herself, gets on welfare rolls, and talks her way into college. But once she’s there, the phallocratic story of “overcoming” permeates every subject. Creative writing professors depend heavily on Freytag’s pyramid to analyze life. So Ariel turns to a rich subcultural canon of resistance and failure, populated by writers like Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldúa, Tillie Olsen, and Kathy Acker.

Wryly riffing on feminist literary tropes, We Were Witches documents the survival of a demonized single mother. She’s beset by custody disputes, homophobia, and America’s ever-present obsession with shaming odd women into passive citizenship. But even as the narrator struggles to graduate—often the triumphant climax of a dramatic narrative—the question lingers uncomfortably. If you’re dealing with precarious parenthood, queer identity, and debt: What is the true narrative shape of your experience?

Poet Danez Smith’s new collection, Don’t Call Us Dead (Graywolf), is a haunting mediation on black trauma, loss, and desire.

From the publisher:

Award-winning poet Danez Smith is a groundbreaking force, celebrated for deft lyrics, urgent subjects, and performative power. Don’t Call Us Dead opens with a heartrending sequence that imagines an afterlife for black men shot by police, a place where suspicion, violence, and grief are forgotten and replaced with the safety, love, and longevity they deserved here on earth. Smith turns then to desire, mortality—the dangers experienced in skin, body, and blood—and a diagnosis of HIV positive. “some of us are killed / in pieces,” Smith writes, “some of us all at once.” Don’t Call Us Dead is an astonishing collection, one that confronts America where every day is too often a funeral and not often enough a miracle.

Writer Eileen Myles’ new book Afterglow (Grove Press) mixes pathos and comedy to explore the often life changing relationship “between pet and pet-owner.”

From the publisher:

This newest book paints a kaleidoscopic portrait of a beloved confidant: the pit bull called Rosie.In 1990, Myles chose Rosie from a litter on the street, and their connection instantly became central to the writer’s life and work. During the course of their sixteen years together, Myles was madly devoted to the dog’s well-being, especially in her final days. Starting from the emptiness following Rosie’s death, Afterglow (a dog memoir) launches a heartfelt and fabulist investigation into the true nature of the bond between pet and pet-owner. Through this lens, we witness Myles’s experiences with intimacy and spirituality, celebrity and politics, alcoholism and recovery, fathers and family history, as well as the fantastical myths we spin to get to the heart of grief.

Moving from an imaginary talk show where Rosie is interviewed by Myles’s childhood puppet to a critical reenactment of the night Rosie mated with another pit bull, from lyrical transcriptions of their walks to Rosie’s enlightened narration from the afterlife, Afterglow (a dog memoir) illuminates all that it can mean when we dedicate our existence to a dog.

Acclaimed critic Daniel Mendelsohn‘s memoir An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic (Knopf ) filters a father and son relationship through one of literature’s most renowned text:

When eighty-one-year-old Jay Mendelsohn decides to enroll in the undergraduate Odyssey seminar his son teaches at Bard College, the two find themselves on an adventure as profoundly emotional as it is intellectual. For Jay, a retired research scientist who sees the world through a mathematician’s unforgiving eyes, this return to the classroom is his “one last chance” to learn the great literature he’d neglected in his youth–and, even more, a final opportunity to more fully understand his son, a writer and classicist. But through the sometimes uncomfortable months that the two men explore Homer’s great work together–first in the classroom, where Jay persistently challenges his son’s interpretations, and then during a surprise-filled Mediterranean journey retracing Odysseus’s famous voyages–it becomes clear that Daniel has much to learn, too: Jay’s responses to both the text and the travels gradually uncover long-buried secrets that allow the son to understand his difficult father at last.

As this intricately woven memoir builds to its wrenching climax, Mendelsohn’s narrative comes to echo the Odyssey itself, with its timeless themes of deception and recognition, marriage and children, the pleasures of travel and the meaning of home. Rich with literary and emotional insight, An Odyssey is a renowned author-scholar’s most triumphant entwining yet of personal narrative and literary exploration.

As always, if we missed an author or book, or if you have a book coming out next month, please email us.

 

 

Fiction

 

Nonfiction

 

 LGBT Studies

 

Young Adult and Children’s 

 

Romance

 

Illustrated 

 

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror 

 

Mystery/Thriller

 

Erotica

 

Bio/Memoir

 

Poetry

 


Tags: , ,
  • Beautiful Dreamer Press

2 Responses to “New in September: Ariel Gore, Danez Smith, Eileen Myles, and Daniel Mendelsohn”

  1. Andrew Beck 15 September 2017 at 3:19 PM #

    Did you know that the link from Glory Hole takes one to a page called WatchCartoonsOnLine?

    I don’t know if that is a joke or not, or if down among the adventures of Quick Draw McGraw or the Powderpuff Girls, there is a Glory Hole anime, but I thought you might be interested in knowing!
    And if there is a Glory Hole anime in there, please let me know as well!!!

    Andrew Becl


    • William Johnson 15 September 2017 at 5:49 PM #

      Oops, corrected.



Leave a Reply to Andrew Beck

Please fill the required box or you can’t comment at all. Please use kind words. Your e-mail address will not be published.

Gravatar is supported.

You can use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>