'A Thin Bright Line' by Lucy Jane Bledsoe

The backdrops of the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and the emerging science of climate research are combined into a novel honoring the queer communities of the 50s and 60s… read more

'JD' by Mark Merlis

Jonathan Ascher, an acclaimed 1960s radical novelist and poet, has been dead for thirty years and all but forgotten when an academic approaches his widow Martha for permission to consult Jonathan’s private papers in preparation for writing his biography. Initially hostile to the biographer and his request, Martha eventually relents, but not before she herself… read more

'Centaur' by Greg Wrenn

Contemporary books that invoke the classics risk pretension. It was with some trepidation, then, that I approached Greg Wrenn’s Centaur, with its eight-poem cycle on a man who transforms himself into one of the mythical horse-legged creatures. What I found, however, was a book which deals much more with personal—rather than Ovidian or Kafkaesque—metamorphosis. The… read more

'A Horse Named Sorrow' by Trebor Healey

A Horse Named Sorrow has the musicality of a punk rock anthem; as a reader, you experience the same sensation of seeing your favorite underground band perform live, singing along with the unforgettable lyrics that have defined your youth…… read more

'The Paternity Test' by Michael Lowenthal

At first glance, the concept of Michael Lowenthal’s The Paternity Test (Terrace Books/University of Wisconsin Press) reads like the possible synopsis of a new television show. The plot of two gay men deciding to become fathers by way of a surrogate mother feels familiar in the current culture of gay-family based sitcoms (The New Normal)… read more