Reviews

‘Deserted Echo’ by Linda Kay Silva


Deserted Echo takes us on another heart-pumping journey in the Echo series. Echo Branson, her family of supernaturals, and technical-guru-and-sometimes-security-person Sal, are in Mexico for a vacation. What begins as a relaxing time on a Mexican beach turns into a tense drama filled with characters with ulterior motives and warped objectives. In spite of the… read more

'Forgive Me If I’ve Told You This Before' by Karelia Stetz-Waters


Filled with tender moments and a remarkable family, Karelia Stetz-Waters’ YA novel Forgive Me If I’ve Told You This Before (Ooligan Press) is a queer coming of age story set against the political landscape of rural Oregon in 1992. What’s timeless about this novel is the familiar teenage struggle to find love, acceptance, and oneself…. read more

‘New York 1, Tel Aviv 0’ by Shelly Oria


“[…] the book’s main draw is the Oria’s uncanny ability to create rich, fully realized characters in the span of just a few pages, and to do so in a way that demonstrates her grasp of an impressive range of styles, genres, and structures.”… read more

'Now and Yesterday' by Stephen Greco


Fresh out of college, Peter moved to New York City in 1975. Wide-eyed and determined to make it as a poet, he and his boyfriend, Harold, moved into a place in Brooklyn, ready to face whatever hurdles came their way. Fast-forward to 2012, Peter is a bigwig at an advertising agency and Harold has long… read more

'Miracle Girls' by MB Caschetta


Miracle Girls is an intriguing blend—part exploration of family ties, part exploration of what faith can look like, part radical concept, part history—and Caschetta does a wonderful job of weaving it all together…. read more

‘Blue Horses’ by Mary Oliver


Continuing an artistic renaissance that began with A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver’s latest poetry collection, Blue Horses, finds her exploring a new home and rediscovering love…. read more

'Spheres of Disturbance' by Amy Schutzer


“[Spheres of Disturbance] disturbs our ideas about the end of our lives, about how death goes—it invites us to ask ourselves what we want, for our lives and our deaths.”… read more