More Trans & Bi Books. Fewer Gay Romance & Lesbian Erotica.

For the Lambda Literary Awards, 2010 will be the year of a couple of records: more books nominated than ever before—509 as of Dec. 31, with a few still trickling in—and, for the first time, enough titles submitted in Transgender and Bisexual that both categories have been split into Fiction and Nonfiction.

Within categories, however, there has been some ebb and flow. Lesbian Romance, as last year, is the largest, with 56 books nominated at year’s end—more than 10 percent of the total!

The Drama category has been strengthened with the inclusion of titles from a couple of publishers specializing in playscripts, and authors of books in Children’s/YA, SF/Fantasy/Horror, both Memoir categories, both Debut categories, both Poetry categories, and the catch-all Nonfiction category are well represented.

Browse Photos from 22nd Annual Lambda Literary Awards in NYC May 2010. Photo: Donna F. Aceto

On the other hand, there are far fewer nominations in Gay Romance—queer boys didn’t woo queer boys last year?—and there isn’t much lady lust in Lesbian Erotica, either. There’s nothing static about LGBTQ publishing… and you can savor the richness of the nominees for 2010 here.

The Lammy’s 92 judges are now in their reading phase, with a final load of tomes to land on their doorsteps this month, and with finalists in this year’s 24 categories due by mid-March. Much credit and many thanks are due the publishers and individual authors that nominated book’s this year—more than 230 of them. But I’m most grateful for the work of the judges, many of whom have volunteered their leisure time and their eager eyes for years; their considered opinions and their collective wisdom are the backbone, year after year, of the Lambda Literary Awards.

Richard Labonté
Lambda Literary Awards Administrator
awards@lambdaliterary.org



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  • Lou Kief

6 Responses to “Record-Breaking Submissions: 2010 Lambda Literary Awards”

  1. […] Literary posted “2010 In Review: Best Book Covers”, “New In January”, “2010 Lambda Literary Awards Submissions Break Records”, and a […]


  2. Elisa 6 January 2011 at 5:27 AM #

    That’s strange, for the Rainbow Awards I had exactly the opposite problem, I had so many Gay Erotica and Gay Romance submission, that I had to split the Contemporary category in Mainstream Contemporary, Erotica and Romance. Lesbian Contemporary did good too, indead not so many Lesbian Erotica submission. I had a lot of submission for the Mystery/Thriller category, not so much for Fantasy and Sci-Fi, and I was expecting more for Paranormal/Horror and Historical, but they did good. Without doubt the Contemporary had the lion share. More or less I had 50% submission for the Gay category, 35% for the Lesbian and only 15% for the Bisexual/Transegender.


    • Antonio Gonzalez Cerna 6 January 2011 at 12:02 PM #

      Hi Elisa!
      Thanks for writing. Good to compare between the two submissions. Maybe the romance authors preferred to enter the general fiction or debut fiction category and therefore left romance wide open? We’ll see what happens come finalist time.


      • Elisa 6 January 2011 at 3:10 PM #

        Actually I think people have still a bit of prejudice of the romance category, they still think it’s not a serious category I think. And then most of the authors asked me the “boundaries” for a story to be erotica or not, I think that most of the time, if there is sex, people expect for it to be erotica more than romance. So yes, or it’s contemporary or it’s erotica, and the romance that is somewhere in the middle remains out. It’s difficult to define “romance”, sincerely I think that most of the stories, if they are about two persons in love, is romance, but then I’m obsessed ;-)


  3. Sally 6 January 2011 at 2:07 PM #

    The fact that there were enough Transgender titles to split the category into both Fiction and Nonfiction is great news. Not only does it mean a wealth of new reading material to promote as part of my Gender Identity & Expression Reading Challenge, but it suggests that publishers are becoming more open to the material, recognizing the ‘T’ in LGBT (so to speak).

    Hopefully, by recognizing the efforts of this year’s crop of authors, we can help nurture an environment that supports even more titles next year.



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