'Camp Marmalade' by Wayne Koestenbaum

In Camp Marmalade the reader is thrown into the snarl and constantly retangling snatches of Wayne Koestenbaum’s stream-of-consciousness musings and reflections… read more

'Seed' by David Eye

Eye’s poems give us the surprising and varied complexity of human relationships: from a video booth encounter and some quick sex with a married man, to an impromptu make-out session with a straight blonde girl in a bar, to an unassuming woman on a bus carrying a copy of Leathermen’s Guide to the Universe…. read more

'In Full Velvet' by Jenny Johnson

Johnson’s language celebrates the natural world, bringing ecology into the world of lesbians, suggesting both that people can be queer anywhere … read more

'Lowly' by Alan Felsenthal

Alan Felsenthal is a trickster at heart. His diction can turn on a dime from the sacred and the elevated to the contemporary every-day, from nymphs and the underworld to the use of the search engine, Google. … read more

'Starshine & Clay' by Kamilah Aisha Moon

This collection is beautiful and harrowing and terribly vital. There’s nothing ordinary, nothing common about Moon’s writing, which holds a bright light to darkness and says, come forward.

read more

'What Weaponry' by Elizabeth J. Colen

Once Elizabeth J. Colen lays an image down (and she lays images down one at a time, like celluloids or tracing paper), it’s impossible to un-see or un-know it. And—the most remarkable of all— the truths she constructs are far more nuanced and intuitive to the human condition…. read more

'Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016' by Frank Bidart

Half-light is a stunningly vital volume, each poem, whether new or one widely read by many for years, glints and holds its sharpness. Any reader of American poetry will be able to return to this tome, like a well, and, for at least a few moments, find a deep abiding sense of being understood, of not being the only one who is broken…. read more

'Blindsight' by Greg Hewett

Greg Hewett’s fifth collection engages with memory and sight and the limitations—indeed, fallibility—of each. As he explores his own failing eyesight, the poet seems to distrust “mere” sight, as well as the language we use to describe our seen lives… read more